Sound Designer Scott Lehrer on his Audio Choices for Carousel on Broadway

Stage Directions

The 2018 revival of Carousel, which started previews in February, just finished up its Broadway run at the Imperial Theatre in NYC. Rogers and Hammerstein’s 1945 classic was revived with a fully digital sound design by Scott Lehrer, whose design was nominated for a Tony Award.

There’s a lot of music in Carousel, from “If I Loved You” to the vocal challenge of “You’ll Never Walk Alone”, with 34 actors on stage and a fully acoustic—no electronic instruments—orchestra of 26. Sound design for the musical played a crucial role and was made possible by Lehrer’s technical expertise. Lehrer’s associate sound designer was Alex Neumann and the A1 for the show was Carin Ford.

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The Grand Hall Rises as Battersea Arts Centre Reopens

Howard Sherman

That the Battersea Arts Centre in London is calling its current programming roster its Phoenix Season should come as no surprise to anyone aware of the venue’s recent history. In early 2015, an overnight fire rendered the Grand Hall, the largest space in the century-old facility, a charred wreck, with little but the exterior walls remaining. Fortunately, the construction of the building was such that the while the Grand Hall was a shambles, the other parts of the building, equally historic, escaped any significant damage. Unlike most organizations facing such devastation, BAC was already discussing reconstruction with architects the day after the disaster. How did they manage to set to planning so quickly?

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Shadows in the Dark

Jay Duckworth

Superstitions in the Theater
If I am ever home alone and just feeling a little lonely, I put on a scary movie and about 30 minutes later I am pretty much convinced that there is someone in the house with me. My friend’s cabin in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey has a ghost called Hazel Grunzel, the first owner of the cabin. It’s strange how we always shut more doors than any of us open! Theaters are no different; almost every theater I have worked at has a ghost or two.

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The Fake Food Cookbook

Jay Duckworth

We are at that time of gift-giving, when we give things to people that we hope they will need and use. One of the gifts I received this summer and have used [Really, I did, see this month’s Answer Box] was a book that Tammy Honesty brought out to NYC on her last visit. The Fake Food Cookbook: Props You Can’t Eat for Theatre, Film, and TV created by Karestin Harrison and Tamara L. Honesty from Focal Press is a great new resource. I spoke with the authors to learn how the book came into existence.

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Shaking the Tree

Lisa Mulcahy

Reflections on Writing My Eighth Book
I remember my first days at Brandeis University, when I entered the school’s wonderful theater arts program as a freshman. It felt magical and special to walk into the vast Spingold Theater and imagine myself performing on its stage (which I started doing soon after, loving every minute of it). As my years at Brandeis happily progressed, I learned EVERYTHING—every aspect of top-notch theater study and practice was available right in front of me. I studied acting with the late, great Ted Kazanoff and playwrighting with the incredible Edward Albee, sang and performed many classic musical theater roles, worked as a production sound designer, studied theater history (which I found fascinating), and completed my honors thesis in directing. I learned the practical skills that made me tough enough to survive as an actress in Boston theater right after graduation, and honed the chutzpah I needed to direct, produce, and teach professionally in Boston and New York, too. 

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Reflections and Respect - A note from the Editor

Michael Eddy

Fall always makes me a bit reflective, assessing where things are at as they start to get back underway from the ‘lazy days’ of summer (a term coined by someone who has never done summer stock, obviously!). I was recently thinking about the fact that SD is 30 years old this year, which is almost as long as I’ve been married and five years younger than my professional career in theater. Things have changed over the past three decades, yet much has stayed the same. One of the things that I love about theater is that we have our traditions, our seasons, a shared way of working; yet we adapt and change over time. As technologies are created to improve our lives, much of what we do in theater is still created in similar manners and methods, just with better tools and processes. 

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The Confident Craftswoman

Lisa Mulcahy

Makeup Artist and Wig Specialist Tara Cooper
Tara Cooper has always believed in herself as an artist, and it’s carried her far. The Texas-based makeup artist and wig specialist’s credits are highly diverse, and her collaborators impressive. She is also an adjunct faculty member at St. Edwards University. Cooper has worked at scores of respected regional theatres, including Austin Shakespeare, The Vortex, TexARTS, the Palindrome Theatre, and the Zach Scott Theatre. Her show credits include Book of Grace, Metamorphoses, The Way of the World, One Night with Janis, Antigone, Carousel, Tuesdays with Morrie, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? On the Verge, The Crucible, Peer Gynt, Tartuffe, Cloud 9, City of Angels, On the Town, Measure for Measure and Romeo and Juliet. She’s also worked on local crews for touring productions like The Lion King, Priscilla Queen of the Desert, Mamma Mia!, and Wicked.

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Del Hughes Lifetime Achievement Awards

Stage Directions

On Monday, September 17, 2018, the Stage Managers’ Association (SMA) will present its annual Del Hughes Lifetime Achievement in the Art of Stage Management Awards to three stage managers from the worlds of Broadway, regional theatre, and dance: Roy Harris, Lyle Raper, and Maxine Glorsky. In addition to the three Lifetime Achievement Awards, the SMA will recognize Peter Sargent of Webster University with a special award for Achievement in Stage Management Education for his work as an educator. 

Considered the crowning achievement in a stage manager’s career, the Del Hughes Award is awarded to those who represent the finest qualities of stage management: patience, diplomacy, organization, and a sense of humor. The awards were named for Del Hughes, who had an illustrious career as a Broadway and television stage manager as well as a TV director from 1933 to the 1970’s. 

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A Conversation with Costume Designer Jess Goldstein

Howard Sherman

Jess Goldstein’s work in costume design is perhaps most familiar from Jersey Boys, which has been playing around the world for the past 14 years. His Broadway credits include Tintypes (1980), The Most Happy Fella (1992), Love! Valour! Compassion! (1995), Take Me Out (2003), The Rivals (2004), The Merchant of Venice (2010), Newsies (2010), and On the Town (2014). His roughly 90 Off-Broadway credits include the original New York production of Buried Child, as well as multiple plays by Jon Robin Baitz, Terrence McNally, and Donald Margulies. He has also designed extensively in regional theatre and opera, and has been on the design faculty of the Yale School of Drama since 1990. He retires from Yale at the end of the current academic year.

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