Cherelle Guyton
Cherelle Guyton

Cherelle Guyton: Artistry of Hair & Wig Design

Porsche McGovern

Cherelle Guyton currently works as the Wig and Hair Supervisor at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.  I met her after a panel discussion at the Theatre Communications Group conference in Portland, OR this year. Cherelle Guyton is an artist, entrepreneur, educator, designer and speaker.  She is the CEO and Designer of C Stylez U, LLC, a bi-coastal wig and makeup design business.  C Stylez U offers a variety of wig and makeup design services for theatre, tv/film, photography, marketing videos, commercials and also serves individual clients. She has designed over thirty-three productions to date, including Les Miserables, voted one of the 2015 "Best of Ashland" plays.

Read more
For every "hello," stage managers soon find themselves saying "goodbye"
For every "hello," stage managers soon find themselves saying "goodbye"

How to Say Goodbye to a Show

David J. McGraw
One of the perks of a life in theatre is the near-constant stream of collaborators.  But for every “hello” there is soon a “goodbye.”

This is especially true for me this past week as I saw the close of my summer show and I gave my notice to the University of Iowa, where I have taught for the past 14 years.  Sometimes the goodbyes are right on schedule as you knew the show closing date when you took on the contract; other times you are forced to decide when it is time to move on.

Read more
Courtland Trapp
Courtland Trapp

Patience is Proven

Ross Jackson

An Interview with Courtland Trapp, Technician

Courtland Trapp is an African American Freelance Technician who has worn multiple hats since the age of 17. His first introduction to theater came as an actor in a stage play. During that process he took notice of the techs behind the scenes and their problem solving skills. Realizing he was up for the challenge he changed his position the following show. Since then, he has been a Stage Manager, Set Designer, Master Flyman/Rigger, and also a Teacher teaching kids set design at multiple performing arts centers in and out of the Los Angeles area.

Read more
Photo by Peter Woodward
Photo by Peter Woodward

Overstocking Our Pond?

David J. McGraw

I’ll give credit to social media for one thing: it allows you to see if others are facing the same problems. Recently there was an online discussion about shadowing, a topic near and dear to me, not just as a training tool for new stage managers but also as an opportunity for established stage managers to reflect. Nothing like having company over to motivate you to clean up your place/calling station/callboard/promptbook!

Read more
Wendy Eastland is a Hispanic Stage Manager
Wendy Eastland is a Hispanic Stage Manager

Passion, Opportunity, and Problem Solving

Ross Jackson

An Interview with Wendy Eastland, Stage Manager

Wendy was born in Honduras and her family moved to the U.S. when she was two. She is from Cedar Hill, TX, about 30 minutes south of Dallas, TX. Though currently live in Dallas, TX, Wendy will soon be moving to Philadelphia, PA where she spent two years after graduating from college, establishing a sense of home. She is a stage manager for primarily straight plays and musicals so far. Wendy identifies as Hispanic. 

Read more
Photo by Robin Webster.  Copyrighted, licensed for reuse.

Near Future Tech for Stage Managers

David J. McGraw

The annual USITT conference wrapped up in St. Louis a couple of weeks ago and I had the pleasure of participating in two panels and attending several others. I also clearly did not budget enough time on the Stage Expo floor: three hours was not enough time to check out all of the latest technology and software advances. But there are two pieces of near-future tech that I didn’t see but I am convinced someone should invent for stage managers.

Read more
"If you get tired learn to rest, not to quit"  ~Banksy

Stage Manager Longevity (and How to Achieve It)

Marguerite Sugden

 

Do stage managers have a ticking time bomb working against them? Is there some sort of magic number of years or experiences or productions that they can work on before getting burnt out? It almost seems inevitable that a stage manager cannot manage the stage forever. Why is this? What are the causes and can it be avoided or fixed?

Read more